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    Basilisk Lizardling

    Some local legends claim that the first basilisk emerged from a lizard’s egg that was turned to stone, then incubated by a cockatrice; it’s quite ridiculous if you ask me, because it does not work.. The basilisk, often confused for the cockatrice, is a lizard-like creature with eight small legs, armed with a powerful grinding jaw and a gaze that can turn its prey to stone.

    What is known for certain about them is that they are deeply connected to the minerals that compose their nest. This is demonstrated by their habitat choice, eating tendencies, mineral scent and even the mineral their victim is transformed into. Most varieties will turn their victims to slate, sandstone or granite, but there are rare cases where I have seen basilisks turn their victims into jade, lapis and even obsidian. No matter what, they make stunning statues out of any living thing.

    Egg Care

    Basilisks lay their eggs biannually in pure mineral deposits. The eggs blend into their surroundings with matching colors and shapes, making them very difficult to locate and identify, and are almost as hard as the rocks themselves. This serves to protect them if stepped upon, although this probably wouldn’t help under the feet of a giant.

    The nest is mixed with similar sized stones to provide both food and camouflage for the hatchlings. If you have obtained multiple eggs, I recommend that you separate them and pack them inside a barrel of stones that match the mineral of the egg and nest. If this is not done, or a blend of minerals is used, the emergent lizardling will be weaker than its potential. Upon hatching, basilisk lizardlings immediately begin consuming both the stones and eggs around it, ensuring that only the strongest of the clutch survives (hence, the need for separating the eggs).

    General Care

    Despite their small size when hatched, basilisks are very hungry and very dangerous. Their stone-turning gaze is functional upon hatching and cannot be disabled, so by far the best method to handle basilisks is to be fully prepared with safeguards against petrification. I strongly recommend keeping the creature in an isolated pen where it can hunt and explore without posing a threat to anyone outside the pen, unless that is intentional...

    Jacob Wood

    Although the basilisk can eat various raw minerals and stones, it is far more nutritious for them to feed upon prey they’ve turned to stone. This is important as it will affect both the basilisk’s growth and the strength of their gaze. Some trainers do this to intentionally weaken the gaze so that less precautions are required to handle and train it. The problem with this practice is that it stunts the growth and power of the basilisk’s gaze, which grows more powerful with age. It also leaves you with a hungry, upset basilisk who will take any opportunity to turn on its trainers.

    Training

    The best way I can describe a basilisk’s gaze is that of a continuous ray, radiating from their eyes which can never be disabled or turned off. This coincidentally makes it easy to track the beast by just following the zig-zag of petrified matter. However, its gaze is still dangerous and very lethal. When working with a basilisk, it is important to wear protective gear and to keep a fail-safe nearby. My recommendation is to use goggles with petrified amber lenses, and a travel cloak that completely covers the skin with the stoneskin spell cast upon it. It does not matter whether it’s permanent or not, as the spell should last you a number of hours; however, spellcasting fees do to add up, so the enchantment may be a more affordable option. As for the fail-safe, I recommend a nearby spellcaster or potions to revert any damage that the basilisk may cause during training.

    Both solitary and very temperamental creatures, basilisks have no conception of hierarchy, making training a very difficult and drawn-out process that can take upwards of three to five years. Don’t feed it prior to any training exercises and utilize its favorite snacks to reward good behavior, though don’t expect too much in the early years. When you start, you may need to be a little forceful since basilisks do not initially respond quickly or well to verbal feedback.


    Once during my travels I met a young wizard rearing her own basilisk, whose gaze turned objects into rose quartz. For special guests she would gift a rose turned to quartz; I still keep an example of this beauty with me on my travels.

    Rearing Difficulty

    Extremely Difficult

    Intelligence

    Clever

    WARNING: Extremely Dangerous

    1.

     
     
     
     
     
     
     

    Basilisk Lizardling

    Jacob Wood

    Rearing Difficulty

    Extremely Difficult

    Intelligence

    Clever


    WARNING: Extremely Dangerous


    Some local legends claim that the first basilisk emerged from a lizard’s egg that was turned to stone, then incubated by a cockatrice; it’s quite ridiculous if you ask me, because it does not work.. The basilisk, often confused for the cockatrice, is a lizard-like creature with eight small legs, armed with a powerful grinding jaw and a gaze that can turn its prey to stone.

    What is known for certain about them is that they are deeply connected to the minerals that compose their nest. This is demonstrated by their habitat choice, eating tendencies, mineral scent and even the mineral their victim is transformed into. Most varieties will turn their victims to slate, sandstone or granite, but there are rare cases where I have seen basilisks turn their victims into jade, lapis and even obsidian. No matter what, they make stunning statues out of any living thing.

    Egg Care

    Basilisks lay their eggs biannually in pure mineral deposits. The eggs blend into their surroundings with matching colors and shapes, making them very difficult to locate and identify, and are almost as hard as the rocks themselves. This serves to protect them if stepped upon, although this probably wouldn’t help under the feet of a giant.

    The nest is mixed with similar sized stones to provide both food and camouflage for the hatchlings. If you have obtained multiple eggs, I recommend that you separate them and pack them inside a barrel of stones that match the mineral of the egg and nest. If this is not done, or a blend of minerals is used, the emergent lizardling will be weaker than its potential. Upon hatching, basilisk lizardlings immediately begin consuming both the stones and eggs around it, ensuring that only the strongest of the clutch survives (hence, the need for separating the eggs).

    General Care

    Despite their small size when hatched, basilisks are very hungry and very dangerous. Their stone-turning gaze is functional upon hatching and cannot be disabled, so by far the best method to handle basilisks is to be fully prepared with safeguards against petrification. I strongly recommend keeping the creature in an isolated pen where it can hunt and explore without posing a threat to anyone outside the pen, unless that is intentional...

    Although the basilisk can eat various raw minerals and stones, it is far more nutritious for them to feed upon prey they’ve turned to stone. This is important as it will affect both the basilisk’s growth and the strength of their gaze. Some trainers do this to intentionally weaken the gaze so that less precautions are required to handle and train it. The problem with this practice is that it stunts the growth and power of the basilisk’s gaze, which grows more powerful with age. It also leaves you with a hungry, upset basilisk who will take any opportunity to turn on its trainers.

    Training

    The best way I can describe a basilisk’s gaze is that of a continuous ray, radiating from their eyes which can never be disabled or turned off. This coincidentally makes it easy to track the beast by just following the zig-zag of petrified matter. However, its gaze is still dangerous and very lethal. When working with a basilisk, it is important to wear protective gear and to keep a fail-safe nearby. My recommendation is to use goggles with petrified amber lenses, and a travel cloak that completely covers the skin with the stoneskin spell cast upon it. It does not matter whether it’s permanent or not, as the spell should last you a number of hours; however, spellcasting fees do to add up, so the enchantment may be a more affordable option. As for the fail-safe, I recommend a nearby spellcaster or potions to revert any damage that the basilisk may cause during training.

    Both solitary and very temperamental creatures, basilisks have no conception of hierarchy, making training a very difficult and drawn-out process that can take upwards of three to five years. Don’t feed it prior to any training exercises and utilize its favorite snacks to reward good behavior, though don’t expect too much in the early years. When you start, you may need to be a little forceful since basilisks do not initially respond quickly or well to verbal feedback.


    Once during my travels I met a young wizard rearing her own basilisk, whose gaze turned objects into rose quartz. For special guests she would gift a rose turned to quartz; I still keep an example of this beauty with me on my travels.

     
     
     
     
     
     
     

    Basilisk Lizardling

    Jacob Wood

    Rearing Difficulty

    Extremely Difficult

    Intelligence

    Clever


    WARNING: Extremely Dangerous


    Some local legends claim that the first basilisk emerged from a lizard’s egg that was turned to stone, then incubated by a cockatrice; it’s quite ridiculous if you ask me, because it does not work.. The basilisk, often confused for the cockatrice, is a lizard-like creature with eight small legs, armed with a powerful grinding jaw and a gaze that can turn its prey to stone.

    What is known for certain about them is that they are deeply connected to the minerals that compose their nest. This is demonstrated by their habitat choice, eating tendencies, mineral scent and even the mineral their victim is transformed into. Most varieties will turn their victims to slate, sandstone or granite, but there are rare cases where I have seen basilisks turn their victims into jade, lapis and even obsidian. No matter what, they make stunning statues out of any living thing.

    Egg Care

    Basilisks lay their eggs biannually in pure mineral deposits. The eggs blend into their surroundings with matching colors and shapes, making them very difficult to locate and identify, and are almost as hard as the rocks themselves. This serves to protect them if stepped upon, although this probably wouldn’t help under the feet of a giant.

    The nest is mixed with similar sized stones to provide both food and camouflage for the hatchlings. If you have obtained multiple eggs, I recommend that you separate them and pack them inside a barrel of stones that match the mineral of the egg and nest. If this is not done, or a blend of minerals is used, the emergent lizardling will be weaker than its potential. Upon hatching, basilisk lizardlings immediately begin consuming both the stones and eggs around it, ensuring that only the strongest of the clutch survives (hence, the need for separating the eggs).

    General Care

    Despite their small size when hatched, basilisks are very hungry and very dangerous. Their stone-turning gaze is functional upon hatching and cannot be disabled, so by far the best method to handle basilisks is to be fully prepared with safeguards against petrification. I strongly recommend keeping the creature in an isolated pen where it can hunt and explore without posing a threat to anyone outside the pen, unless that is intentional...

    Although the basilisk can eat various raw minerals and stones, it is far more nutritious for them to feed upon prey they’ve turned to stone. This is important as it will affect both the basilisk’s growth and the strength of their gaze. Some trainers do this to intentionally weaken the gaze so that less precautions are required to handle and train it. The problem with this practice is that it stunts the growth and power of the basilisk’s gaze, which grows more powerful with age. It also leaves you with a hungry, upset basilisk who will take any opportunity to turn on its trainers.

    Training

    The best way I can describe a basilisk’s gaze is that of a continuous ray, radiating from their eyes which can never be disabled or turned off. This coincidentally makes it easy to track the beast by just following the zig-zag of petrified matter. However, its gaze is still dangerous and very lethal. When working with a basilisk, it is important to wear protective gear and to keep a fail-safe nearby. My recommendation is to use goggles with petrified amber lenses, and a travel cloak that completely covers the skin with the stoneskin spell cast upon it. It does not matter whether it’s permanent or not, as the spell should last you a number of hours; however, spellcasting fees do to add up, so the enchantment may be a more affordable option. As for the fail-safe, I recommend a nearby spellcaster or potions to revert any damage that the basilisk may cause during training.

    Both solitary and very temperamental creatures, basilisks have no conception of hierarchy, making training a very difficult and drawn-out process that can take upwards of three to five years. Don’t feed it prior to any training exercises and utilize its favorite snacks to reward good behavior, though don’t expect too much in the early years. When you start, you may need to be a little forceful since basilisks do not initially respond quickly or well to verbal feedback.


    Once during my travels I met a young wizard rearing her own basilisk, whose gaze turned objects into rose quartz. For special guests she would gift a rose turned to quartz; I still keep an example of this beauty with me on my travels.

    1.

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    Image
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    Blink Puppy

    This distinct dog breed is easily recognizable by uniquely glossed eyes, lovable demeanor and, obviously, its ability to teleport (otherwise known as blinking) from place to place. Of course, this is only the face their owners see; enemies can expect to be greeted with snarling jaws and plenty of unexpected attacks. Blink dogs are feared for their unanticipated assaults, blinking in to take a bite out of their prey, only to teleport away to safety. Blink puppies fetch quite the ransom on the black market, so poachers are known to go to great lengths to grab them.

    When a female blink dog is in heat she creates a scent trail, teleporting from spot to spot, leaving a sort of scavenger hunt for the male to follow. Only the most diligent suitors with the strongest noses and keen sense of teleportation will find the female waiting in a dark cave for her suitor to arrive. Though no one has actually witnessed blink dog mating, those who have seen the cave from afar note the firework-like flashing that occurs.

    The gestation period lasts three months, resulting in a litter of two to five puppies. When they are born they fit in the palm of a hand, not opening their eyes for at least four days. Once they do, they instantly imprint on the first being they see, showing them extreme loyalty for the rest of their lives. In most cases, this loyalty imprints on their parents and the other puppies, creating an instant familial bond. However, this is the primary reason why poachers crave newborn puppies, placing them in a dark box so that they can bond with the highest bidder.

    For the first few months, both parents reside in the cave until the pup is old enough to run on its own. During this time, the parents are fiercely territorial, even showing a defensive hostility to members of their own pack. There have been several instances of passersby who have been severely mauled for passing too close to a blink dog cave that had newborn pups inside. Only when the pups have grown into their full range of motion and coordination do the parents rejoin their pack and return to their mostly-nomadic lifestyle.

    General Care

    Rearing blink puppies is a difficult but rewarding

     

    Eloy Lasanta

    duty. With enough love and care, the pup can grow into a part of any family, one that, even if they teleport away, they’ll always return to. The job is made easier if the pup has imprinted on their owner, intensifying their connection and affection for them.

    While blink puppies are capable of eating either meat or plants in their diet, many caretakers have actually found a connection between diet and attitude. Raw meats tend to make them very active and sometimes agressive while a purely vegetarian diet will make the blink dog more relaxed and docile. The majority of you are probably expecting to have the blink dog accompany you on your journeys so it is recommended to ensure a balanced diet.

    To give one a bath and wash away the dust and dirt, one only needs to get them into the water. Their fur is quite thin, and just a little dousing is enough to fully clean them off. Getting them wet is the problem, since their teleportation abilities are innately connected to their instinctive reactions. Their blinking makes playing fetch a breeze and makes avoiding their licks much harder, but bath-time can take all day. Blink puppies actually like to be dirty for some reason, too, always rolling around in the nearest patch of mud.

    Rearing

    The biggest question owners get is, “How do you keep a blink puppy from running away?” Getting a regular dog to stay still while attempting to rear it is hard enough, but one that can teleport anywhere they can see? You can’t cage them and you can’t leash them, but there is a thing called a temporal leash, an especially expensive item usually sold at an exorbitant up-charge from specialized caretakers. The leash is placed around the puppy’s neck and a control bracelet around the caretakers’s wrist, keeping them from going too far before hitting an invisible wall. It is a small price to pay for the security of one’s furry child.

    Caretakers should always keep an eye out for people watching when their dog blinks. The sight can startle the unexpecting and entice the unsavoury. Poachers are everywhere, and even though newborns are ideal, unscrupulous patrons will still pay good money for adolescent or adult blink dogs if they can get their hands on them.

    Rearing Difficulty

    Tricky

    Intelligence

    Intelligent

    3.

     
     
     
     
     
     
     

    Blink Puppy

    Eloy Lasanta

    Rearing Difficulty

    Tricky

    Intelligence

    Intelligent


    This distinct dog breed is easily recognizable by uniquely glossed eyes, lovable demeanor and, obviously, its ability to teleport (otherwise known as blinking) from place to place. Of course, this is only the face their owners see; enemies can expect to be greeted with snarling jaws and plenty of unexpected attacks. Blink dogs are feared for their unanticipated assaults, blinking in to take a bite out of their prey, only to teleport away to safety. Blink puppies fetch quite the ransom on the black market, so poachers are known to go to great lengths to grab them.

    When a female blink dog is in heat she creates a scent trail, teleporting from spot to spot, leaving a sort of scavenger hunt for the male to follow. Only the most diligent suitors with the strongest noses and keen sense of teleportation will find the female waiting in a dark cave for her suitor to arrive. Though no one has actually witnessed blink dog mating, those who have seen the cave from afar note the firework-like flashing that occurs.

    The gestation period lasts three months, resulting in a litter of two to five puppies. When they are born they fit in the palm of a hand, not opening their eyes for at least four days. Once they do, they instantly imprint on the first being they see, showing them extreme loyalty for the rest of their lives. In most cases, this loyalty imprints on their parents and the other puppies, creating an instant familial bond. However, this is the primary reason why poachers crave newborn puppies, placing them in a dark box so that they can bond with the highest bidder.

    For the first few months, both parents reside in the cave until the pup is old enough to run on its own. During this time, the parents are fiercely territorial, even showing a defensive hostility to members of their own pack. There have been several instances of passersby who have been severely mauled for passing too close to a blink dog cave that had newborn pups inside. Only when the pups have grown into their full range of motion and coordination do the parents rejoin their pack and return to their mostly-nomadic lifestyle.

    General Care

    Rearing blink puppies is a difficult but rewarding duty. With enough love and care, the pup can grow into a part of any family, one that, even if they teleport away, they’ll always return to. The job is made easier if the pup has imprinted on their owner, intensifying their connection and affection for them.

    While blink puppies are capable of eating either meat or plants in their diet, many caretakers have actually found a connection between diet and attitude. Raw meats tend to make them very active and sometimes agressive while a purely vegetarian diet will make the blink dog more relaxed and docile. The majority of you are probably expecting to have the blink dog accompany you on your journeys so it is recommended to ensure a balanced diet.

    To give one a bath and wash away the dust and dirt, one only needs to get them into the water. Their fur is quite thin, and just a little dousing is enough to fully clean them off. Getting them wet is the problem, since their teleportation abilities are innately connected to their instinctive reactions. Their blinking makes playing fetch a breeze and makes avoiding their licks much harder, but bath-time can take all day. Blink puppies actually like to be dirty for some reason, too, always rolling around in the nearest patch of mud.

    Rearing

    The biggest question owners get is, “How do you keep a blink puppy from running away?” Getting a regular dog to stay still while attempting to rear it is hard enough, but one that can teleport anywhere they can see? You can’t cage them and you can’t leash them, but there is a thing called a temporal leash, an especially expensive item usually sold at an exorbitant up-charge from specialized caretakers. The leash is placed around the puppy’s neck and a control bracelet around the caretakers’s wrist, keeping them from going too far before hitting an invisible wall. It is a small price to pay for the security of one’s furry child.

    Caretakers should always keep an eye out for people watching when their dog blinks. The sight can startle the unexpecting and entice the unsavoury. Poachers are everywhere, and even though newborns are ideal, unscrupulous patrons will still pay good money for adolescent or adult blink dogs if they can get their hands on them.

     
     
     
     
     
     
     

    Blink Puppy

    Eloy Lasanta

    Rearing Difficulty

    Tricky

    Intelligence

    Intelligent


    This distinct dog breed is easily recognizable by uniquely glossed eyes, lovable demeanor and, obviously, its ability to teleport (otherwise known as blinking) from place to place. Of course, this is only the face their owners see; enemies can expect to be greeted with snarling jaws and plenty of unexpected attacks. Blink dogs are feared for their unanticipated assaults, blinking in to take a bite out of their prey, only to teleport away to safety. Blink puppies fetch quite the ransom on the black market, so poachers are known to go to great lengths to grab them.

    When a female blink dog is in heat she creates a scent trail, teleporting from spot to spot, leaving a sort of scavenger hunt for the male to follow. Only the most diligent suitors with the strongest noses and keen sense of teleportation will find the female waiting in a dark cave for her suitor to arrive. Though no one has actually witnessed blink dog mating, those who have seen the cave from afar note the firework-like flashing that occurs.

    The gestation period lasts three months, resulting in a litter of two to five puppies. When they are born they fit in the palm of a hand, not opening their eyes for at least four days. Once they do, they instantly imprint on the first being they see, showing them extreme loyalty for the rest of their lives. In most cases, this loyalty imprints on their parents and the other puppies, creating an instant familial bond. However, this is the primary reason why poachers crave newborn puppies, placing them in a dark box so that they can bond with the highest bidder.

    For the first few months, both parents reside in the cave until the pup is old enough to run on its own. During this time, the parents are fiercely territorial, even showing a defensive hostility to members of their own pack. There have been several instances of passersby who have been severely mauled for passing too close to a blink dog cave that had newborn pups inside. Only when the pups have grown into their full range of motion and coordination do the parents rejoin their pack and return to their mostly-nomadic lifestyle.

    General Care

    Rearing blink puppies is a difficult but rewarding duty. With enough love and care, the pup can grow into a part of any family, one that, even if they teleport away, they’ll always return to. The job is made easier if the pup has imprinted on their owner, intensifying their connection and affection for them.

    While blink puppies are capable of eating either meat or plants in their diet, many caretakers have actually found a connection between diet and attitude. Raw meats tend to make them very active and sometimes agressive while a purely vegetarian diet will make the blink dog more relaxed and docile. The majority of you are probably expecting to have the blink dog accompany you on your journeys so it is recommended to ensure a balanced diet.

    To give one a bath and wash away the dust and dirt, one only needs to get them into the water. Their fur is quite thin, and just a little dousing is enough to fully clean them off. Getting them wet is the problem, since their teleportation abilities are innately connected to their instinctive reactions. Their blinking makes playing fetch a breeze and makes avoiding their licks much harder, but bath-time can take all day. Blink puppies actually like to be dirty for some reason, too, always rolling around in the nearest patch of mud.

    Rearing

    The biggest question owners get is, “How do you keep a blink puppy from running away?” Getting a regular dog to stay still while attempting to rear it is hard enough, but one that can teleport anywhere they can see? You can’t cage them and you can’t leash them, but there is a thing called a temporal leash, an especially expensive item usually sold at an exorbitant up-charge from specialized caretakers. The leash is placed around the puppy’s neck and a control bracelet around the caretakers’s wrist, keeping them from going too far before hitting an invisible wall. It is a small price to pay for the security of one’s furry child.

    Caretakers should always keep an eye out for people watching when their dog blinks. The sight can startle the unexpecting and entice the unsavoury. Poachers are everywhere, and even though newborns are ideal, unscrupulous patrons will still pay good money for adolescent or adult blink dogs if they can get their hands on them.

    3.

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    Image
    Image
  •  
     
     
 
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